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On the Media’s Partial Portrayal of Conflict Torn ...

On the Media’s Partial Portrayal of Conflict Torn Regions…

Every time something happens, people interpret it in different ways as every one’s point of view and perception differs. One story can be told in many different ways and most times, the media tells a part of the story they feel is  captivating enough and don’t really focus of those other parts that seem inconsequential and this happens a lot especially in times of inter-tribal or inter-religious crisis and it is something that has gone on for many years.

Every time an incident occurs, we get the feeling that we are getting a one-sided review from the media. Numbers, figures and descriptions are exaggerated and are conflicted and one begins to wonder what really happened, because we know some of these reports are totally outrageous and yet, most times there is no one to tell us the other side of the story.

People who were rescued after being held captive by Boko Haram, sit as they wait for medical treatment at a camp near Mubi, northeast Nigeria October 29, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

People who were rescued after being held captive by Boko Haram, sit as they wait for medical treatment at a camp near Mubi, northeast Nigeria October 29, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

In the various war torn regions, many have history, culture and very interesting identities. The Niger-Delta militant crisis for example, many may be led to just condemn and criticize their actions especially those who have no personal ties and only react based on what they have read or heard. When you look deeper, or talk to someone who has been affected in one way or the other by oil spillage and oil related misfortune, you will see that they have been wronged deeply and are only trying to fight for a right to live right the best way they can, I am not saying their actions are justified but you can see there is always more to a story.

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Militants attack Nigerian state oil, gas pipeline in Niger delta – Yahoo News

At the “Bits of Borno” photo exhibition, I had a chance to chat with the brain behind the works, Fati Abubakar, documentary photojournalist and she said

“To be honest, I started this project because I was unhappy with the medias portrayal of Borno state. I felt like they only focused on the conflict and couldn’t see beyond Boko haram. I wanted people to see the every day life of the ordinary individual there, you know we are resilient and strong people who have endured all of this but are still very keen to move on.”

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Thankfully, times have changed and social media has helped reduce this one-sided media effect and has pushed the media into digging deeper, being more thorough and telling the story as it should be and not just giving the version that will sell more. People can share their own stories the way it should be told and they don’t have to wait for the media to come tell the world what or how they should tell their story. There are always two or more sides to every story and no one can truly conclude or understand something except all the parts are complete.

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