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The Climate Change In Africa Is Worse Than You Thi...

The Climate Change In Africa Is Worse Than You Think, Here’s Why

The ongoing rise in global average temperature near earth surface may be worse than what we think.

A group of diverse photographers on Instagram – hailing from 5 different continents – have made the conscious effort to let Africa and the world know the extent at which climate change is affecting the world in general. The increasingly alarming effects of climate change cannot be overemphasised.

The set of pictures below and the story behind them will give you an insight to how deep this issue is.

Photo by @matildegattoni for @everydayclimatechange At the end of the last ice age, about 11,000 years ago, northern Africa became a grassland, home to fish, elephants and thousands of people. Then, 5,000 years ago, scientists say, it abruptly turned into an enormous wasteland—the vast desert that we now call the Sahara. The shift from savanna to sand was the result of natural climate change, triggered by a cyclical alteration in the sun's orbit. The decline in rainfall pushed residents south and east and perhaps contributed to the rise of the Egyptian civilization. Today, scientists say, the region is again feeling the heat, this time from man-made climate change. #sahara #desert #africa #sanddunes #climatechange #climatechangeisreal #desertification

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

At the end of the last ice age, about 11,000 years ago, northern Africa became a grassland, home to fish, elephants and thousands of people. Then, 5,000 years ago, scientists say, it abruptly turned into an enormous wasteland—the vast desert that we now call the Sahara.

The shift from savanna to sand was the result of natural climate change, triggered by a cyclical alteration in the sun’s orbit. The decline in rainfall pushed residents south and east and perhaps contributed to the rise of the Egyptian civilisation. Today, scientists say, the region is again feeling the heat, this time.

Repost; Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @cristinamittermeier of @everydayclimatechange In small-scale fisheries, women make up half of the workforce. These women, of the Vezo people of Western Madagascar, have suffered from negative impacts on the marine ecosystem due to overfishing, damage to reefs and mangroves, and invasive species. Artisanal fishers depend on the health of marine ecosystems for their subsistence. The added threat of climate change and sea level rise threatens biodiversity and human well being. Protecting the ocean, and responsibly managing fisheries, means protecting these women and giving them a better chance. #madagascar #fishing #women #work #ocean #conservation #climatechange #globalwarming #searise #cristinamittermeier #everydayclimatechange

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

In small-scale fisheries, women make up half of the workforce. These women, of the Vezo people of Western Madagascar, have suffered from negative impacts on the marine ecosystem due to overfishing, damage to reefs and mangroves, and invasive species. Artisanal fishers depend on the health of marine ecosystems for their subsistence. The added threat of climate change and sea level rise threatens biodiversity and human well-being. Protecting the ocean, and responsibly managing fisheries, means protecting these women and giving them a better chance.

Photo by @matildegattoni for @everydayclimatechange A villager quickly removes all her belongings from her house as the high tide rises and starts flooding the streets. As a direct consequence of global warming and sea level rise, more than 7,000 kms of coastline from Mauritania to Cameroon are eroding at a pace of up to 36 metres per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments scramble to salvage big cities and industrial complexes, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold, pushing a thousands-year-old way of life on the brink of extinction. Once home to thriving fishing settlements, the coastline of Ghana and Togo is now a sequence of crumbling buildings and ghost towns which have been swallowed by the ocean in little more than 20 years. As climate change wipes away houses, churches and plantations, it also destroys the livelihood, cultural heritage and social fabric of entire communities, with dangerous consequences for the future of the whole continent. Rising temperatures have prompted fish stocks to move to cooler waters away from the coasts, starving the local fishing industry, while erosion and salinization have affected agriculture by reducing the quantity of arable land and contaminating freshwater reserves. Deprived of their means of survival and with no hope for the future, communities lose their most resourceful people to migration. As rampant unemployment drives drugs and alcohol consumption, the only profitable activities are offered by criminal syndicates involved in fuel smuggling and illegal sand mining. Far from being an isolated issue, the problems haunting West Africa now are the harbinger of what mankind will experience if we won't be able to find a viable balance between progress, social inequality and environmental conservation. In a world where progress is synonymous with urbanization and consumerism, the lives of traditional communities are constantly being sacrificed on the altar of modernity, even when the increasing pressure on natural resources should prompt an overhaul of our priorities. This conundrum is becoming the most pressing issue of our times.

A photo posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

A villager quickly removes all her belongings from her house as the high tide rises and starts flooding the streets.
As a direct consequence of global warming and sea level rise, more than 7,000 kms of coastline from Mauritania to Cameroon are eroding at a pace of up to 36 metres per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments scramble to salvage big cities and industrial complexes, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold, pushing a thousands-year-old way of life on the brink of extinction.

Once home to thriving fishing settlements, the coastline of Ghana and Togo is now a sequence of crumbling buildings and ghost towns which have been swallowed by the ocean in little more than 20 years. As climate change wipes away houses, churches and plantations, it also destroys the livelihood, cultural heritage and social fabric of entire communities, with dangerous consequences for the future of the whole continent.

Rising temperatures have prompted fish stocks to move to cooler waters away from the coasts, starving the local fishing industry, while erosion and salinization have affected agriculture by reducing the quantity of arable land and contaminating freshwater reserves. Deprived of their means of survival and with no hope for the future, communities lose their most resourceful people to migration. As rampant unemployment drives drugs and alcohol consumption, the only profitable activities are offered by criminal syndicates involved in fuel smuggling and illegal sand mining.

Far from being an isolated issue, the problems haunting West Africa now are the harbinger of what mankind will experience if we won’t be able to find a viable balance between progress, social inequality and environmental conservation. In a world where progress is synonymous with urbanisation and consumerism, the lives of traditional communities are constantly being sacrificed on the altar of modernity, even when the increasing pressure on natural resources should prompt an overhaul of our priorities. This conundrum is becoming the most pressing issue of our times.

Woman descends the mountain to her village after worshipping in a church further up in the Ethiopian Highlands. After suffering one of the worst droughts in decades, now the Northern Ethiopian Highlands are experiencing heavy rains, as the pendulum has swung back the other way, creating worry about crop failures due to the rains. USAID has designated this region of the highlands as having a high to extreme risk of food insecurity, hence the food distribution. Northern Ethiopian Highlands.

Video @edkashi/@viiphoto: Nana Acheampong and some of his family work on processing #cocoa on their farm in Bonsaaso, Ghana on Oct. 3, 2015. Ghana is among the world’s leading producers of chocolate, but this production is predicted to be greatly impacted by global warming. An article on climate.gov explains cocoa producing countries like Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, and Indonesia will experience a 3.8°F temperature increase by 2050, reducing suitable cultivation areas by a significant amount. “Rising temperatures alone won’t necessesarily hurt #cacao production…the danger to chocolate comes from an increase in evapotranspiration, especially since the higher temperatures projected for West Africa by 2050 are unlikely to be accompanied by an increase in rainfall, according to business-as-usual carbon dioxide emissions scenarios. In other words, as higher temperatures squeeze more water out of soil and plants, it’s unlikely that rainfall will increase enough to offset the moisture loss.” #globalwarming #everydayclimatechange #cocoa #ghana #actonclimate

A video posted by Everyday Climate Change (@everydayclimatechange) on

Nana Acheampong and some of his family work on processing #cocoa on their farm in Bonsaaso, Ghana on Oct. 3, 2015. Ghana is among the world’s leading producers of chocolate, but this production is predicted to be greatly impacted by global warming. An article on climate.gov explains cocoa producing countries like Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, and Indonesia will experience a 3.8°F temperature increase by 2050, reducing suitable cultivation areas by a significant amount. “Rising temperatures alone won’t necessarily hurt #cacao production…the danger to chocolate comes from an increase in evapotranspiration, especially since the higher temperatures projected for West Africa by 2050 are unlikely to be accompanied by an increase in rainfall, according to business-as-usual carbon dioxide emissions scenarios. In other words, as higher temperatures squeeze more water out of soil and plants, it’s unlikely that rainfall will increase enough to offset the moisture loss.”

 

To see more pictures and stories from around the world, you can visit Everydayclimatechange Instagram page

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